Sponsor an Item

SAADA is a donor-supported organization. Help us keep these unique and rare materials free to the public by sponsoring your favorite item today.

Sponsorship is a unique way to show your commitment to documenting, collecting and preserving the rich stories of the South Asian American community. You can also sponsor an item in honor of a friend or loved one.

Donate $10/month or $120 to sponsor an item and support its preservation and care for one year.

"What the World Is Doing: A Record of Current Events" (1910)


Article from March 26, 1910 issue of Collier's Weekly on the "Hindu Invasion," which discusses the recent influx of South Asian laborers. The article goes on to mention a recent announcement by the Asiatic Exclusion League that the "Hindus in California numbered 10,000," and their presence is an "unmitigated nuisance." Includes two related images.

Sponsor this Item
Donate $10/month or $120 to sponsor this item and
support its preservation and care for one year.


Samachar, Vol. 1


Samachar is a newsletter edited and distributed by LOTUS, a non-profit organization dedicated to the promotion of Indian culture in Hawaii. Vol. 1, published for January/February 2000, includes an article titled "Dharma and Karma" by Rama Nath Sharma, Professor of Sanskrit at the University of Hawaii.

Sponsor this Item
Donate $10/month or $120 to sponsor this item and
support its preservation and care for one year.


India Against Britain


Pamphlet dated November 1, 1916 that collects various editorials by Ram Chandra, editor of the Gadar newspaper, in which he responded in U.S. newspapers to endorsements of British rule in India by Lord Hardinge, Austin Chamberlain, Lord Islington, and other "Anglo-Indian sabre-rattlers." Includes an image documenting proof of British censorship of letters, and an image of twelve Gadar members who had been imprisoned in India.

Sponsor this Item
Donate $10/month or $120 to sponsor this item and
support its preservation and care for one year.


"Indian Students Abroad" (1911)


Short biography in the September 1911 issue of Modern Review of Benoy Bhusan Bose from Dhaka, and his educational career in science and industry in Tokyo and the U.S. The biography mentions Bose's work with the Detroit India Society, "founded for the furtherance of Indian National Education," and lectures at Unitarian Churches in Iowa, Ann Arbor, and Detroit. Includes a photograph of Bose.

Sponsor this Item
Donate $10/month or $120 to sponsor this item and
support its preservation and care for one year.


"National Council of Education Scholars in America" (1911)


Article from the January 1911 issue of Modern Review on students selected by the National Council Education, Bengal to study in the U.S. Includes an image of the students awarded the National Council scholarship: Surendra Nath Ball (Michigan State University), Bejoy Kumar Sarkar (Harvard), Jatindranath Seth (Harvard), Dhirendra Kumar Sarkar (Yale), Narendranath Das Gupta (Yale), and Hiralal Roy (Harvard).

Sponsor this Item
Donate $10/month or $120 to sponsor this item and
support its preservation and care for one year.


Maud Ralston, "The India Society of Detroit" (1911)


Article from September 1911 issue of Modern Review written by Maud Ralston on the India Society of Detroit. Ralston explains that the membership of the India Society of Detroit is primarily Hindu students at the University of Michigan, earning a technical education. She also remarks on the the organization's nationalist ideology, citing the society's goal of encouraging "Hindus resolved upon establishing national education and rehabilitating their industries." Ralston also touches on certain racial ideologies of the era, emphasizing the common "racial link" between the Caucasian and the South Asian: "The Aryan of the East has found an Aryan in the West and is one at home in a strange land." Furthermore, she explains how the "high-caste Indian gentleman" distinguishes himself from African-Americans by wearing a turban, protecting himself from "color-prejudice."

Sponsor this Item
Donate $10/month or $120 to sponsor this item and
support its preservation and care for one year.


Saint Nihal Sing, "Colour Line in the United States of America..." (1908)


Lengthy article published in November 1908 issue of Modern Review by Saint Nihal Sing on the condition of African Americans, and the continued efforts for racial uplift. Sing frames the issue as one that would appeal especially "to the people of Hindostan, as they are confronted with 'the crime of colour,' in their own land." Throughout Sing compares African Americans struggle for equality to Indians struggle for sovereignty: "The white man metes out the same treatment to coloured people in India and out of India. It makes little difference whether the coloured man is an Indian, a Chinese, a Japanese or an Afro-American." Accompanied by various slides, including photos of John Hertel, Hollis Burke Frisell, Charles Alexander, and several residencies of "coloured men."

Sponsor this Item
Donate $10/month or $120 to sponsor this item and
support its preservation and care for one year.


J.T. Sunderland, "Principal Heramba Chandra Maitra in America" (1911)


An article by J.T. Sunderland in the February 1911 issue of Modern Review, which traces Brahmo Samajist Heramba Chandra Maitra's visit to the United States. Sunderland discusses the negative perception of India from Americans, and discusses how the work of Maitra, and other Indian religious figures from Protab Chandra Mazoomdar onward, have helped counter those views. Much of Maitra's visit involved delivering lectures and addresses at Unitarian churches and universities in New England, New York, and Chicago. The subjects of his lectures included the ideals of Brahmo Samaj, the "Religion of the Future: And India's Contribution to It," and the work of Theodore Parker.

Sponsor this Item
Donate $10/month or $120 to sponsor this item and
support its preservation and care for one year.


Gulab Watumull


Photography of Gulab Watumull speaking with customers. Photo credited to Honolulu Star-Bulletin.

Sponsor this Item
Donate $10/month or $120 to sponsor this item and
support its preservation and care for one year.


Saint Nihal Sing, "The Picturesque Immigrant from India's Coral Strand" (1909)


Essay in Los Angeles-based Out West magazine by Saint Nihal Singh on the Hindu immigrant in North America, with an emphasis on the Hindu's "picturesque" qualities and dress. Singh provides descriptions of clothes and hairstyles worn by the "Mahometan," the Sikh soldier, as well as other "specimens of the Hindu genus homo." Singh also makes several comparisons along the lines of the racial pseudoscience of the period: "A number of the Hindoo immigrants have kinky hair like a negro's wool," and elsewhere, "The hide of the Hindoo varies from the dull, pale, sallow-brown of a Mexican to the extreme black of an African." The article delves into caste distinctions between the "dusky immigrants," but concludes that the experience of being new arrivals has "broken the back-bone of caste."

In addition to Singh's emphasis on physical descriptions and classifications, he provides an overview of the history of South Asian immigration to Canada and the U.S., and the Parliament of Religions in Chicago. The essay includes several photographs captioned as follows: "A Group of East-Indian Students in the United States," "A Typical Hindoo Student," "A Brahmin Priest," "Hindu Missionaries to America," "A Sikh and a Mohammedan," "Two Military Men from India," "A Sikh Priest."

Sponsor this Item
Donate $10/month or $120 to sponsor this item and
support its preservation and care for one year.


St. Nihal Singh, "Indian Students in America"


Article by St. Nihal Singh on the experiences of Indians students in America, published in the August 1908 issue of the Calcutta-based Modern Review. Singh describes the various reactions that Indians receive from Americans: "To an average American, every one who hails from Hindostan is a "Hindoo" -- and no matter how clever he may be, he is taken for a nirvanic and unanimated character." Elsewhere, Singh writes that for another class of Americans "the Indian is the representative of the dark and dismal regions of 'heathendom.'" Singh also describes the effect of "color prejudice," and how the Indian student is often mistreated as a Negro, and treated poorly as a result, citing the example of one Dr. Nat C. Baynes, from Madras, whose photograph is included in the article. Singh also goes into detail about other issues that face Indian students, including basic sustenance, the cost of living, and so on, and goes into detail about several Americans who have have helped Indian students through collegiate organizations.

Includes nine unique images of the following subjects: 1) Lucy Euphemea Adams, 2) Nat C. Baynes, 3) Jatindra Mohan Bose, 4) Sayyid Mohamad Jaffer, 5) May Wright Sewall, 6) Mr. and Mrs. Forssell, 7) Shankar Rao, 8) Metropolitan Firm of Advertisers (Including an Indian Artist), 9) Indian Students in Chicago.

Sponsor this Item
Donate $10/month or $120 to sponsor this item and
support its preservation and care for one year.


"The Call of the Martyrs"


Bulletin of the Hindustan Gadar Party Memorial Committee (Vol. 3, No. 10) dated August 1967, with a front page story on Bhagat Singh Thind. Thind had visited the Gadar Memorial Committee, and commented, "I am unable to fathom the minds of Indian Government leaders who have played hide and seek so long with the Gadar Memorial Committee and show no inclination to honor the martyred souls who gave their all for the freedom and unity of their land. Their mercantile mentality is miserable repulsive to all that we hold high and honorable." The bulletin also includes several other articles, written in English, Punjabi, and Urdu. One editorial addresses visits from two visiting scholars, Dr. D.P. Singhal, Dr. D. Devahuti, and Prof. Ved Prakash Vatuk, who introduced the two to the Gadar memorial committee's work. Elsewhere the bulletin describes a meeting at the El Centro Sikh Temple in Imperial Valley, California and a joint resolution to erect a Gadar memorial at 5 Wood Street, San Francisco. Several other articles describe the efforts to create a Gadar memorial, criticize the unfulfilled promises made by the late Prime Minister Lal Bahadur Shastri, Sant Fateh Singh, and Consul General Mohammad Yunus to do so. Includes one poem (in Hindi and English) titled "The Welfare of All" by Ved Prakash Vatuk.

Sponsor this Item
Donate $10/month or $120 to sponsor this item and
support its preservation and care for one year.


"The Hindu, The Newest Immigration Problem" (1910)


October 1910 article in The Survey reporting on the influx of "Hindu" laborers on the Pacific coast. The article mentions that an estimated 5,000 Hindus had entered San Francisco during the past twelve months. The reaction to newcomers, the article explains, is a mixture of fascination with "these white turbaned newcomers" on the Pacific Coast, and racial antagonism in line with the anti-Asiatic sentiment against Japanese immigrants. The article cites two problems associated with the Hindu newcomers, as seen by Rev. George E. Burlingame of San Francisco: "The civic and social question concerns the ability of the nation to assimilate this class of Hindus," and secondly, "the welfare of the thousands who are already here and the communities in which they have settled." Burlingame provides two interesting photographs of Sikhs on the steamship Nippon Maru on their arrival to San Francisco in late August that year.

Sponsor this Item
Donate $10/month or $120 to sponsor this item and
support its preservation and care for one year.


The Hindusthanee Student (January 1914)


The January 1914 issue of The Hindusthanee Student: A Quarterly Review of Education, published by the Hindusthan Association of America (HAA) in Chicago. The officers of the Association include Sudhindra Bose, C. Chakravarty, Rafidin Ahmed, S.M. Pagar, S.N. Kar, and Basanta Koomar Roy, with a longer list of councillors from "East," "Middle West," and "West" sections.

The issue contains four sections devoted to "special articles," short editorials, reports from the second annual convention of the HAA, and "news notes." The HAA convention took place in Chicago, December 30-31 1913, including delegates from the University of Illinois, Iowa, and Wisconsin. Sudhindra Bose gave the presidential address, extracts of which are included in the issue. Includes a portrait of Rabindranath Tagore and an image of the members of the Iowa Chapter of the HAA from May 1913.

Sponsor this Item
Donate $10/month or $120 to sponsor this item and
support its preservation and care for one year.


Pakistan Forum Vol. II, No. 1


The October 1971 issue of Pakistan Forum (Vol. 2, No. 1), based in Ontario and edited by Aijaz Ahmad, Eqbal Ahmad, and Feroz Ahmed. Includes essays and reviews by Saghir Ahmad, Feroz Ahmed, Abdul H. Khan, including an interview with Muzzaffar Ahmed, President of the pro-Moscow Bangladesh National Awami Party. The issue begins with an obituary of Saghir Ahmad, one of the editors of Pakistan Forum, who died before its publication.

Sponsor this Item
Donate $10/month or $120 to sponsor this item and
support its preservation and care for one year.